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EarthCache language

+1 vote
235 views
We are thinking about placing/writing an EarthCache in Tenerife. We will write it primarily in English as it's our first language. We were thinking we should also write it in Spanish and maybe German. How would you go about this? Just use Google translate? And is it necessary?
asked Feb 20, 2018 in Miscellaneous by NSCR (4,540 points)

9 Answers

+2 votes
English is the most international language here in Europe so it should be enough to provide listing in this language. Do not use Google translate to create a listings! It usually ends up very weird or funny for everyone who knows this language and then very awkward for the owner (especially in case of EC, which is usually full of geological terms that are not handled well by google translator).

Using German and Spanish too is a good practice too, especially in these tourist destinations. The best solution would be to find somebody who speaks this language well (either local, from friends or local community in your area), who could translate you at least the EC requirements. Make sure that you have also translated the answers, so you can verify them!

If somebody really wants to know more about the subject and does not understand English, he can translate it himself using google translate to get basic idea.
answered Feb 20, 2018 by Jakuje (Moderator) (92,180 points)
I thought that may be best plan but wanted to ask the question. I thought that Google translate may not be the best idea.

Thanks for your reply.
+6 votes
I believe the guidelines states it should be in the local language, and that other languages can be added. In pratice I guess english will be the most understandable for most people.

My experience is that google translate gives people trying to solve earth caches a hard time...
answered Feb 20, 2018 by knuslet (860 points)
I don't see it in the guidelines that the cache should be in local language:
https://www.geocaching.com/play/guidelines

I certainly saw several caches that were not in local language. But it is certainly a good practice.
Earth cache guidelines: http://www.geosociety.org/GSA/fieldexp/EarthCache/guidelines/home.aspx

7. The EarthCache text and logging tasks must be submitted in the local language. Additional languages are encouraged, but the local language must be listed first. You may be requested to provide text in a language understandable to your reviewer to assist with the reviewing process.
Oh ... thanks for the link. I did not know about that. So yes, you MUST use local language and i would not really recommend using google translate for that.
I think the requirement for local language wasn't there from the beginning. It's definitely possible to find older earth caches that don't adhere to that rule.
+1 vote

English is pretty common, but out there are many people not mastering it.
So the local language should be the first in the listing.

Do not use Google Translate, please. Or only if there is no other option.
Use deepl.com instead. You get much better results.
 

answered Feb 20, 2018 by fankido (1,260 points)
0 votes

Yes, I can confirm deepl.com gives much better results than Google translate.

Nevertheless, the suggestion to have it translated by native speaking peaple from the surrounding should be  the first choice.

Bernd

answered Feb 22, 2018 by Rolli2 (6,200 points)
–1 vote

I saw on some earthcache translators with small Spanish flag French German Portuguese Chinese ... but I do not know how to include them ... nevertheless it is very practical ...

traduit du francais par google

j'ai vu sur certaine earthcache des traducteur avec petit drapeau espagnol francais allemand portugais chinois ... mais je ne sais pas comment les inclure ... pourtant c'est bien pratique ...

answered Feb 22, 2018 by Chup'a (11,130 points)
+1 vote
When we placed an earthcache in Norway, the rule for local language didn't exist.  When the rule changed, though, we thought it would be the right thing to do to add a Norwegian translation.

We contacted a few Norwegian cachers who had good English translations on their geocaches and offered them geocoins in exchange for them providing a Norwegian translation.  It worked out nicely.

(Please, please, PLEASE do not use Google Translate, or any other kind of robot translator.  Please use a human.)
answered Feb 25, 2018 by hzoi (7,400 points)
0 votes
In Englisch ist gut, aber noch besser ist es zusätzlich in Landessprache.

Ich habe einige Caches und ein Event auf Kreta gesetzt, habe zu erst sehr viele Probleme bekommen wegen google übersetzer.
Habe dann auf einheimische Cacher um hilfe gebeten, die ich auch bekommen habe.
Die Übersetzung in google

In English is good, but even better it is also in local language.

I have some caches and an event set in Crete, have gotten very many problems because of google translator.
I then asked for local cacher for help, which I also got.
answered Feb 25, 2018 by Minos2003 (4,680 points)
0 votes
I used the same for my own cache in the Canarias with Spanish, English and German description (to me the local language should always be included, plus English or whatever is the mostly used tourist language). If you wish I will be able to provide you the German and Spanish translation, just let me know.
answered Feb 25, 2018 by Domino_67 (5,890 points)
0 votes
In my opinion all caches should have the full text in the native language. Other languages are nice to have, if expats and/or tourists are known to visit, travel through and/or stay in the region (5km area) of the cache.
answered Feb 27, 2018 by mat_64 (470 points)
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